Made out of the fibre extracted from the Prickly Pear Cactus, the name Sikalindi which stands for the plant, is from the Griko language still spoken in Lecce, a city in southern Italy. Characterised as an invasive plant due to its ability to reproduce quickly and spontaneously, the plant needs constant pruning and thinning. As such the raw material for the Sikalindi tables are derived during these periods of pruning and thinning.

The fibres are extracted from the cladodes (a flattered leaf like stem), when they are still green and is administered to a special patented process that is completely ecological. Afterwards, the fibres are dried to obtain the needed consistency, comparable to that of wood. The dried up fibre is then glued together, following a method similar to that of veneering but which involves much more complex methods. Afterwards each dried piece is analyzed thoroughly and is laid over a plywood plain, one by one, striving to obtain a natural combination and flow. The process is best described as creating a collage where the textures combined always vary, allowing the artist to express his craftsmanship and ingenuity.

Fused thus, the surface is then processed through a machine that blends technology, innovation and tradition, to achieve the perfect shape. It is then calibrated to obtain an elegant and refined appearance. Once the table is assembled, sanding is done in several steps and then treated with wood care and resin products to preserve, increase the mechanical resistance and to make it water-resistant. All these are done by hand showcasing the painstaking craftsmanship. As a final touch, varnish is applied by a paintbrush ensuring that the innate nature of the material is maintained.

The entire production process is done in Salento, Italy. Further, no surface of Sikalindi is identical to another as depending on the way each plant grows, its exposure to rain, sun and wind, the grains of the fibre create distinctive and unparalleled designs and colours.

Kauri (grab)

A collection of coffee tables made out of the fibre of the prickly pear. The planes are set on pedestals of different heights or on tapered legs.

Shapes: circle, square, rectangle and triangle (Available in different colours and sizes)

No surface of Sikalindi is identical to another as depending on the way each plant grows, its exposure to rain, sun and wind, the grains of the fibre create distinctive and unparalleled designs and colours

Sandro Santantonio

As part of the latest collection of Sikalindi, Sandro Santantonio, renowned Italian designer who has collaborated with the company before to produce several other collections has lent a hand focusing on creating new models that attempt to arouse the emotions of the onlooker. All names are derived from Griko. Several years of research, dedication and great craftsmanship have thus produced Kauri, Cerasa and Kalami, three unique models that bespeak exclusivity and an approach never seen before.

Years of research, dedication and great craftsmanship have thus produced Kauri, Cerasa and Kalami, three unique models

Cerasa (cherry)

A sequence of hemispherical bowls interwoven to create a visually fun masterpiece that forms a ‘game’ on the table. The fibre of the prickly pear is applied to the inside, which makes the Cerasa pleasant to the touch. Available in different sizes and colours.

Kalami (cane)

Kalami presents jars “exploded and deconstructed” in chromatic bands alternating with the fibre. The conical shape emphasises the dynamic effect and highlights the well finished angles typical of the manufacturing. Available in different sizes and colours.